Category Archives: Healthy Living

  1. Can Exercise Ward Off Cold and Flu Symptoms?

    As cold and flu season approaches, so does the season of illness prevention.

    From getting flu shots to adding a little extra Vitamin C to our diets, prevention often becomes a focus for those concerned with getting sick, missing work and/or school, and optimizing the joy of their upcoming Holiday Seasons.

    It’s based on this mindset that medical professionals such as physical therapists are most likely to get some version of the question: Can exercise boost my immune system?

    The answer, however, is broader than the question itself.

    Boosting the Immune System

    On a more general level, healthy living is the true key to building and maintaining a strong immune system. Habits like eating right, staying hydrated, getting plenty of sleep, and reducing stress account for some long-lasting, immune-boosting benefits.

    But, regular exercise definitely plays an important role, as well.

    Some studies have shown, for instance, that exercise on its own can play a role in reducing the length and intensity of colds and flu. Such research often points to many of the benefits inherent in regular fitness routines as factors that also help ward off illness:

    • Weight management
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Reduction in stress
    • Improved circulation

    Other studies have concluded that regular, mild-intensity exercise can help reduce illness while prolonged, high-intensity exercise can have the opposite effect by making one more susceptible to catching a bug.

    Based on this, if you feel you may be catching something – a cold, a flu or whatever may be going around – the best initial advice is to pull back on the length and intensity of their exercise routine just to be on the safe side.

    Keep getting your exercise, but also take greater care to make sure you’re staying hydrated, eating well and giving your body time to recover.

    If you do get sick?

    According to advice from the Mayo Clinic, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t continue to exercise. They offer the following two rules of thumb:

    The Neck Rule

    If you catch a cold and find that all the symptoms are concentrated above the neck (i.e., nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing and/or a minor sore throat), it’s typically OK to exercise. Simply reduce your intensity. Instead of going for a jog, for instance, opt to go for a walk.

    In contrast, if you find that you’re experiencing symptoms below the neck – things like a congested chest, a hacking cough or an upset stomach – it’s best to not exercise at all.

    The Fever Rule

    Also, if you have a fever or are experience muscle aches and fatigue throughout your body, take a break from exercising. Instead, get some rest, stay hydrated and, if things don’t improve over a couple of days, visit your doctor.

    The bottom line: it’s always your best bet to listen to your body, and don’t overdo it. Pushing your body too hard when it’s fighting an illness could potentially do you more harm than good.

  2. I Stand Corrected! 5 Common Fitness Myths

    When only one in three adults get the recommended amount of physical activity their bodies need each week (according to the President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition), it’s difficult for we as physical therapists to find fault when an individual is making an effort to exercise … even if the effort’s slightly misguided.

    But since October is National Physical Therapy Month, and physical therapists are the medical community’s preeminent experts in movement, fitness, and musculoskeletal function and injury, we view this month as an opportune time to correct what we see as a few common misconceptions about exercise.

    Good Intentions

    Some of the more common personal goals people make revolve around health, fitness and weight loss, and we as physical therapists are dedicated to supporting these goals through a number of individualized services.

    In doing so, though, it’s important to us that people work toward these objectives in a safe and healthful manner – one which most efficiently moves them toward their goals.

    In this spirit, here are five exercise myths we finds to be common among many fitness-minded people:

    1) Stretching Before Exercise Prevents Injuries

    Perhaps surprisingly, research suggests there’s no connection between pre-workout stretching and injury prevention. In addition, stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    So instead, warm up dynamically before a workout by walking, jogging, doing lunges and leg/arm swings, etc.

    Stretching is still incredibly important, but do your stretches independent of your workouts.

    2) The More, the Better

    For the more goal-driven crowd, a pedal-to-the-metal approach to fitness can seem the quickest and most efficient way to better health.

    However, it’s critical workout intensity and length remain in line with one’s current fitness levels and limits.

    It’s also important to schedule recovery, or off-days, into your routine. Failing to do so can increase your injury risk as well as the risk of burnout.

    3) Cross Training is for Athletes Only

    Cross training is simply working activities into your regimen that differ from your preferred or usual activities. The goal is to improve your overall fitness level by challenging your cardio, strength and balance in different ways.

    Such “training diversification” will help maximize your workout potential while helping to prevent overuse injuries and burnout, so everyone should do it.

    4) Aerobic is More Important Than Strength Training

    Whether it’s because some are concerned about too much “bulking up” or they feel spending their limited time on ellipticals and stationary bikes will maximize their efforts, cardio is often a focus for those seeking to improve health.

    It shouldn’t be the only focus, however.

    Muscular fitness is just as important as cardio for such issues as weight management, bone health, injury prevention, and so on.

    5) If Sore or Injured, Rest is Always Best

    Wrong again.

    While rest has a long history as a go-to response to soreness, pain and injury, research now suggests movement and “active recovery” can actually speed up the healing process, specifically when guided by a physical therapist.

    If pain or injury is keeping you from getting a full dose of exercise and physical activity each week, visit a physical therapist.

    Highly educated and licensed health care professionals, physical therapists like those at our clinic are experts at helping people reduce pain, improve/restore mobility, and ultimately lead more healthful, active lives.

  3. To Stretch or Not to Stretch? Tips for Optimizing Flexibility

    Many have grown up with the understanding that, whenever you’re about to work out, compete or otherwise push your body, it’s important to stretch immediately before the activity in order to prevent injury and perform your best.

    Yet, despite these long-held beliefs – and perhaps surprisingly – there’s little evidence to support this theory.

    Today’s evidence suggests that there’s no connection between injury prevention and stretching – static, or reach-and-hold-type stretching – before a workout. Performance-wise, there’s also no consistent connection, with some studies even suggestions that stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    For example, research released by Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism in 2011 found that the vertical jump heights of young and middle-aged men actually declined when participants stretched beforehand. In contrast, the same study found heights increased after warming up dynamically, or using dynamic stretching.

    Dynamic stretches can best be described as a lower-intensity version of the exercises and movements you plan to perform during your activities or while you’re competing.

    A light jog, some leg swings, lunges, high-knees, arm and shoulder rotations … all these movements can be part of a dynamic stretching routine, depending on the activity you’re about to do.

    Such dynamic warm-ups help you break a sweat, sure, but it does so much more. It ensures your muscles are well-supplied with oxygen, promoting optimal flexibility and efficiency.

    Dynamic stretching, however, can only optimize your current level of flexibility. Static stretching is still vital in maintaining and improving your body’s level of overall flexibility … just not right before an activity.

    So, when’s the ideal time to maintain and improve flexibility through static stretching? Consider the following guidelines:

    Stretch Daily: Just as you should try to get a certain amount of exercise in each day – both cardio and strength training – it’s also important to dedicate 10 to 15 minutes to daily static stretching. Typical static stretches are held for anywhere between 15 to 60 seconds at a time, with each movement repeated two or more times.

    Experts suggest setting time aside for stretching either first-thing in the morning or just before going to bed.

    Stretch During Cool-Downs: Cooling down after an activity helps the body transition from a higher intensity to a resting or near-resting state. While slowed-down exercises (similar to those during dynamic warm-ups) may be included as part of a cool-down, this is also a great time for static stretching.

    As consistent tightness in the muscles and joints can put one more at risk of pain and injury, those who regularly exercise or compete have an annual physical therapy exam. During a PT exam, weaknesses in flexibility, strength and movement can be identified and properly addressed before they manifest into injuries.

  4. 6 Common Back Pain Myths, Debunked

    Despite being one of the top causes of disability in the U.S., affecting around eight in 10 people in their lifetimes, back pain is an ailment often misunderstood by those affected.

    Such misconceptions can cause those suffering from back pain to seek solutions, potential treatment paths, and even lifestyle alterations that aren’t necessarily in their best interests.

    Back pain can be as frustrating as it is debilitating, especially if past preventative measures and treatments haven’t been helpful. And, this can lead a person down paths that don’t result in the best and most necessary evidence-based treatments.

    These paths can sometimes lead to treatments that are more expensive or personally invasive – and perhaps even unnecessary – such as MRIs and surgery.

    MRIs, shots, surgery, medication, etc., should mostly be considered last resort-type solutions. The fact is, most back pain issues will go away on their own in a few days. And even when they don’t, most remaining cases can be successfully resolved through safer, more affordable and more effective treatment approaches.

    To help health care consumers make better decisions when considering solutions to their back-pain issues, we’d like to shed some light on the following common back pain myths:

    1. Bed Rest Helps with Relief & Healing: Once a common treatment for back pain, research strongly suggests long-term rest can slow recovery and even make your back pain worse. Instead, treatment involving movement and exercise (i.e., stretches, walking, swimming, etc.) often works better to hasten healing and provide relief.
    2. The Problem’s in My Spine: Back pain can be caused by a wide array of issues throughout the body as well as one’s environment. It can be a response to the way you move when you exercise, how you sit at work, the shoes you wear, the mattress on which you sleep, or simply your body compensating for movement limitations and weaknesses. Back pain doesn’t necessarily mean you have a “bad back,” or are predisposed to back pain.
    3. I Just Need an ‘Adjustment’: Those accustomed to visiting a chiropractor for back pain issues often claim to find relief from having their spine adjusted, or “cracked.” While this process can release endorphins that offer some temporary relief, only about 10 percent of all back pain cases can actually benefit from spine mobilization. Exercise is often more effective, as is determining and treating the pain’s source. (See item No. 2.)
    4. Medication’s the Answer: A popular quick fix, medication should never be viewed as a long-term solution to chronic back pain issues. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help get you through in the short term, but many prescription pain meds can be dangerous, addictive, and even make the pain worse in some instances.
    5. I’ll Probably Need Surgery: Of people experiencing low-back pain, only about 4 to 8 percent of their conditions can and should be successfully treated with surgery, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Even 90-plus percent of herniated discs often get better on their own through a combination of rest and physical therapy.
    6. I Need a Referral to See a Physical Therapist: Multiple studies have concluded that physical therapy is one of the safest and most effective ways to both treat and prevent back pain. And in nearly every state, patients can access physical therapy services without first getting a physician’s prescription.
  5. Tips for Reducing, Managing Plantar Fasciitis Pain

    Studies show about three-quarters of all Americans will experience foot pain at some point in their lives. Of them, more than 2 million people who seek treatment each year will learn they suffer from an overuse condition called plantar fasciitis.

    Fortunately, most cases of plantar fasciitis are both manageable and treatable.

    Plantar fasciitis will typically present itself as sharp pain in the heel or in the arch of the foot, most often when you’re taking the first steps of the day. The pain is the result of your plantar fascia – the thick band of tissue connecting your heel to the ball of your foot – becoming inflamed due to overuse.

    The inflammation that causes plantar fasciitis can come from a sudden increase in activity levels (i.e., walking or running much longer distances) or from sports-related activities that require a lot of running and jumping. Other causes may include a lot of standing, walking or running on hard surfaces, not wearing shoes that properly support your foot type, or being overweight.

    It’s estimated plantar fasciitis affects about 10 percent of Americans at some point in their lives, with most being diagnosed after the age of 40.

    Plantar fasciitis pain may come and go for some without treatment, but we never recommend ignoring pain as this is your body’s way of telling you something’s wrong. Fortunately, there are some things you can do at home to help relieve the discomfort and hopefully keep the condition from getting worse.

    Tips for the at-home management of plantar fasciitis include:

    Rest: As with any overuse injury, rest is a key component of recovery. Decrease your distances when walking or running, and try to avoid hard surfaces.

    Stretching: Stretch the soles of your feet by gently pulling your big toe back toward your ankle and holding for 10 seconds at a time. Also, wrap a towel around the ball of your foot and, from a seated position with your heel to the floor, slowly pull your toes toward you, stretching the arch of your foot. As tight calves may also make you more susceptible to plantar fasciitis, regular calf stretches are a must.

    Massage: A tennis ball can do wonders as a massaging tool. Roll a tennis ball under the sole of your foot, applying weight as comfort allows. Rolling your foot over a frozen plastic water bottle can also work, with the added benefit of helping decrease pain and inflammation.

    Foot Support: When standing for long periods of time, stand on a thick, padded mat. And don’t take your shoes for granted. Make sure they offer good arch support and that you replace them immediately as the shock absorption begins to wear down.

    If pain persists, however, a more individualized treatment plan from a physical therapist is likely needed. A physical therapist can pinpoint the most likely triggers of your plantar fasciitis pain, then customize a treatment regimen that may include flexibility and strength exercises, footwear recommendations and/or custom shoe inserts, and the possible use of taping or splints to help maintain optimal ankle and toe positions.

  6. Tips for Keeping the Weekend Warrior Healthy, Injury Free

    A “weekend warrior” is someone who, due to the hectic nature of a typical workweek, opts to cram most of her or his exercise into weekend workouts, activities, games and/or competitions.

    And while most physical therapists would never fault anyone for getting exercise, most would also agree that weekend warriors should be particularly cautious as the sporadic nature of their workout schedule puts them at a greater risk of getting injured.

    Days of downtime followed by sudden bursts of activity over a day or two isn’t ideal, after all. By putting greater stress on the body over a shorter period of time, weekend warriors should be aware that they’re putting themselves at greater risk of acute injuries, such as strains, sprains or worse.

    That’s because inactivity throughout the week can lead to a general deconditioning of the body that may include muscle tightness and imbalances, along with reduced endurance and cardiovascular fitness. A more consistent workout schedule can combat such deconditioning.

    But if one truly does struggle to find time to achieve their expert-recommended 150 minutes of exercise each week without cramming them into just a couple of days, we offer to following tips for avoiding injury.

    Space It Out – Rather than packing your weekly exercise minutes into two back-to-back days at the end of the week, consider spacing these days out. This can help you avoid some of the deconditioning effects mentioned above.

    Warm Up, Cool Down – When the weekend arrives and it comes time to take the field, hit the trails or tee off for 18, always warm up first. Take 5 to 10 minutes for some light resistance and cardio exercises to get the blood flowing. And after you’re done, cool down with some stretching. Also, be sure to drink plenty of water throughout.

    Temper Your Intensity – When you’re packing your workouts into just a couple days a week, don’t overdo it. As you’re not exercising as consistently, stay on the safe side by pulling back slightly on your intensity.

    Mix It Up – Try not to fill your weekends with the same activities. Mix it up, perhaps focusing on cardio one weekend and strength another – or a variation thereof. This helps ensure your entire body remains balanced, reducing your chances of injury.

    Stay Active During the Week – Even if you don’t have time to hit the gym during the week, don’t use that as an excuse to be completely sedentary. Capitalize on brief moments during the week to move around, stretch, and maybe even do some exercising. Take the stairs, stretch during your breaks, stand at your desk, walk during meetings or after work, and maybe even fit 10 minutes of at-home resistance training into your evenings.

    Listen to Your Body – Always know your limits. And, if you feel aches and pains or suspect possible injury, stop exercising immediately and see a medical professional, such as a physical therapist. Don’t try to power through discomfort just so you can get through the weekend.

Lake Stevens

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 7:00 pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Balance Rehabilitation
 

  • Vestibular rehabilitation
  • Custom Orthotic Fabrication & Gait Analysis
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment

 

Garrett Hoskins, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Garrett grew up in Washington, attending Oak Harbor High School where he enjoyed track and cross country. He then went on to serve in the United States Navy, gaining the opportunity to see much of the world. Upon completion of his initial service, he went on to complete his first undergraduate degree in Business Management at the University of South Florida. After a short stint in the corporate field, he realized his true passion was in helping others, choosing to return to school working towards a career in healthcare. He then completed a post baccalaureate in Clinical Physiology at Central Washington University (CWU), then continuing his studies with an additional year of work into a Master’s program at CWU in Exercises Science before accepting and completing his Doctorate in Physical Therapy at the University of Puget Sound. Garrett joined the Summit Rehabilitation team in Lake Stevens last year. He has a passion for continuing his educational commitment through establishing and adopting best practice standard, education, and research. In his free time, Garrett enjoys the outdoors with his two dogs.

Dave Wheeler, MPT, COMT, OCS, CEAS, CCI

Dave has been practicing Physical Therapy since 1998 in orthopedic settings and has been the Clinic Director of the Summit Rehabilitation in Lake Stevens since 2008. After getting his undergraduate degree from Washington State University, he went on to earn his Master of Physical Therapy degree from Idaho State University in 1998. Dave has advanced his education and is recognized as a Certified Orthopedic Manual Therapist, Orthopedic Clinical Specialist, and Certified Ergonomics Assessment Specialist. He is also a Credentialed Clinical Instructor, accepting PT and PTA students from around the country. Dave uses a philosophy that includes the combination of manual therapies and exercise to provide individualized treatment plans for every patient. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his daughter and in the outdoors.

Bob Fankhauser, PT, M.Ed, COMT

Bob has been practicing for 40 years as a Physical Therapist in an outpatient orthopedic setting. He graduated from Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles, CA and has an Advanced Certification in Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy and a Master’s Degree in Education. He has a special interest in the foot and ankle as well as the shoulder and knee. As a former teacher and coach, Bob has a long history of working with middle and high school athletes. He enjoys sports, skiing, traveling and enjoys spending time with his 7 grandchildren.

Radhika Brady, PTA

Radhika has been a Physical Therapist Assistant since 2012. She grew up in Mountlake Terrace and graduated from Pima Medical Institute. Radhika enjoys helping people get back to their lives before injury. She is very hands-on, taking the time to listen to each patient’s individual concerns. Radhika is very busy at home with 2 kids, a dog, and a husband to take care of, but in her spare time loves to read and watch movies with her family.

Bryon Flett, PT

Bryon was born in Everett, WA and moved to El Salvador with his parents at age 5 and went lived there for the next 13 years, therefore, he is fluent in Spanish. After graduating from high school, Bryon moved back to WA where he attended Whatcom Community College and then transferred to Western Washington University where he obtained his degree in Kinesiology with a physical therapy focus. From there he was accepted to the University of North Dakota in 2015 and earned his Doctor of Physical Therapy in 2018. Bryon enjoys outdoor activities including running, cycling, hiking, rock climbing, mountaineering, hunting, snowboarding, and camping. His passion for physical therapy stems from his inner outdoor enthusiast and loves getting his patients moving in a pain-free manner so that they too can enjoy the subtleties found in life through movement.

Adrian

Adrian graduated in 2016 with her Bachelors of Science in Kinesiology while attending Texas Woman’s University, then continued her education there to complete her Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2019. Adrian has a passion for educating and empowering her patients in understanding how they can manage pain from injuries to return to their functional goals. Currently, Adrian is a generalist in outpatient orthopedics with interest in future specialties such as geriatrics and vestibular rehabilitation. In her leisure time, Adrian enjoys hiking, exploring the pacific north west, traveling, and spending time with her friends and family.

Liz

Liz graduated the University of Washington with a degree in Sociology. Upon graduation she moved to Southeast Alaska where she lived and worked for 22 years. She spent 18 years as a school district paraprofessional working with children with special needs and physical disabilities as well as owning her own massage therapy practice for 12 years specializing in Swedish, Deep Tissue and Lymphatic massage. She was adjunct faculty at the University of Alaska Southeast teaching certifications in massage therapy and she served as a teaching assistant for the University of Alaska Southeast’s anatomy and physiology courses. Liz returned to WA state in 2014 where she obtained her STOTT Pilates Instructor Certification which grounds its teaching principles in exercise science, alignment, and rehabilitation. In addition, she is certified as a fascial movement instructor through Merrithew Fascial Movement. As a PTA student she completed her certification in LSVT BIG programming for Parkinson’s Disease. Liz graduated Whatcom Community College’s Physical Therapy Assistant program in 2019. In her off-time she enjoys her Pilates practice, teaching Pilates classes, and reading English history.

Elizabeth Stromme, PTA

BIO COMING SOON

Lake Stevens – Hand Therapy

Hours:
Monday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Tuesday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Thursday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Services

  • Hand Therapy Services
  • Custom Splints & Orthotics
  • Post-Surgery/Operative Rehabilitation
 

  • Work Injury Management
  • Repetitive strain injuries

Craig Jordan, MS, OTR/L, CHT, Director of Hand Therapy

Craig is our Director of Hand Therapy and has been working as a hand therapist since his graduation from The University of New England in 2003. Craig graduated with his Masters of Science in Occupational Therapy and then continued his education to receive the distinction of Certified Hand Therapist. Craig continues to develop as a hand therapist with continuing education courses in the area of current upper extremity evidence based best practices. Craig prides himself on his custom fabricated splints using both traditional thermoplastic splinting and functional rigidity casting (FRC). Craig is also an active member of American Society of Hand Therapist’s (ASHT), Hand Therapy Certification Commission (HTCC), National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT), and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). When Craig is not at work he enjoys multiday bikepacking adventures and biking and racing with his local cycling team. Craig is married to his college sweetheart and they have two children.

Brittany Cornell, COTA/L

Graduating from Lake Washington Institute of Technology with an Occupational Therapy Assistant AAS-T in 2013, Brittany’s initial exposure to hand therapy was through her clinical rotations and sparked her interest in what developed into her current specialization. She considers the complexities of the hand both academically fascinating and clinically rewarding by therapeutic applications. Developing objective based goals and providing tangible results for her patients keeps Brittany engaged in what she considers to be most relevant for her patient’s well-being. Regarding future professional aspirations, Brittany plans to apply for a bridge program to obtain her Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family.

Marysville

Hours:
Monday, Wednesday 7:00 am- 7:00 pm
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 7:00 am- 6:00 pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Custom Hand Splints & Orthotics
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment

 

Marc Root, PTA, Clinic Director

Marc Root received his Physical Therapist Assistant training at PIMA medical institute graduating in 2011 and began working at our Cascade Rehabilitation Broadway location later that year. After several years he moved into a float position working at all 10 of our Summit and Cascade Rehabilitation clinics. He has now moved into the Clinic Director Role at Summit Rehabilitation- Marysville. He enjoys helping all types of patients and giving a different perspective to the treatment approach. Marc has a wife, daughter, son and two dogs that he loves to spend time with. In his spare time, he enjoys camping, hunting, fishing and coaching youth baseball. If you see Marc in a clinic you will see him sporting some sort of Seattle Mariners gear and talking about the team during the season and off-season.

Craig Christian, PT, COMT

Why did you become a Physical Therapist?
Leading people from fear, frustration, and disability to ability and confidence is very rewarding.

Continuing Education Commitment: Multiple myofascial and musculoskeletal courses taken over the last 30 years. Currently in the IMPACT program for certification in manipulative therapy.

Personal Interests: Camping, kayaking, fishing, hiking, skiing, and good music are great, but my greatest joy is grandchildren, present and future.

Educational Background: AAS Degree in Medical Radiologic Technology from Oregon Institute of Technology, 1977; BSPT from the University of Washington, 1984; Many CE courses with emphasis on Orthopedics.

Samantha Moseley, PT, DPT

Samantha Moseley is an east coast native who recently moved to the beautiful PNW from Houston, TX after graduating in 2018 with her DPT from the University of Texas — Medical Branch in Galveston, TX.  While she does miss the delicious barbecue that is on every corner in Texas, she has loved getting to explore Washington State. In her spare time Sam enjoys getting lost in the great outdoors no matter the season. She can usually be found tromping through the woods, ascending the various Cascade peaks, skiing all winter, and on the very rare occasion, becoming one with her sofa while watching Netflix.  Sam has experience treating a wide array of musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, and believes in facilitating a strong independence in all of her patients. She is currently working towards obtaining her COMT, an advanced manual therapy specialization, and plans in the future to continue pursuing higher education and advanced physical therapy specializations so that she may provide the highest quality evidenced based care possible.

Tracey Hampshire, PT, DPT

Tracey is originally from Houston, Texas and obtained her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Texas Woman’s University in Dallas. She moved to Washington and began working at Marysville Summit Rehabilitation soon after and loves the PNW. She enjoys working with people from all walks of life and strives to create a safe and welcoming environment conducive to healing and lifelong health and wellness. She is passionate about helping people maintain autonomy in their health and healing through exercise and loves to talk about food during each session.  In her spare time Tracey loves to be active through running, hiking, biking, and swimming. She also loves to cook and bake and try new recipes.

David Morris, PT, DPT

David was born and raised in Baltimore City, MD in the suburbs of Towson – and graduated from University of Maryland Baltimore in 2017 with his Doctor of Physical Therapy. Over the years, David has spent some time working at Boeing as a physical therapist, and at the VA in Washington DC, specifically growing an interest in chronic pain conditions. David enjoys spending his free time with his wife, Elizabeth, and baby Mabel, volunteering with his local church, or traveling. Among his hobbies include rock climbing, beating everyone at board games or just about anything competitive, and building anything from tiny tables to Tiny Houses.

Lisa Walker, MHA, OTR/L

Lisa is originally from Wisconsin and started her career as a COTA and got her Bachelor Degree from Concordia University of WI and Master in Health Administration from the University of Missouri.  She has a passion for sharing her knowledge of health care and Occupational Therapy with clients and co workers.  Throughout her career she has worked in a multitude of treatment settings including skilled nursing, outpatient orthopedic, home health and administration (to name a few). Currently she is working in Hand Therapy and expanding her knowledge base and certification in this setting. Lisa is an active member  of National Board of Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT), American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and Hand Therapy Certification Commission (HTCC). In her spare time she enjoys golf, football, camping and motorcycling.

  Brittany Cornell, COTA/L

Graduating from Lake Washington Institute of Technology with an Occupational Therapy Assistant AAS-T in 2013, Brittany’s initial exposure to hand therapy was through her clinical rotations and sparked her interest in what developed into her current specialization. She considers the complexities of the hand both academically fascinating and clinically rewarding by therapeutic applications. Developing objective based goals and providing tangible results for her patients keeps Brittany engaged in what she considers to be most relevant for her patient’s well-being. Regarding future professional aspirations, Brittany plans to apply for a bridge program to obtain her Master’s Degree in Occupational Therapy. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her family.

Katie Soule, PTA

Katie is a Physical Therapist Assistant who graduated from Whatcom Community College in 2017. She began working at the Marysville Summit Rehabilitation soon after and strives to make every patient feel welcome and ensures that they receive quality care. Katie grew up near the small town of Concrete and currently resides in Burlington with her husband. In her free time, she enjoys paddle boarding, fishing, hiking, and hanging out with her friends and family.

Mill Creek

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:30 pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Lymphedema Therapy
  • Women’s Health
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment

Nick Carter, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I knew early on I wanted to be a physical therapist when I began having chronic ankle sprains and started going to PT myself. MY PT made a big impact on my life and helped me to gain stability and strength that propelled me to greater heights in my sports. The ability to impact people’s lives in a positive way and allow them to achieve their personal goals has continued to push me to be a better physical therapist.
Continuing Education Commitment: My continuing education interests include completing a fellowship in manual therapy. I am also pursuing certification in additional spinal techniques for the state of Washington. I believe in continuously expanding my knowledge to include new research, and to prevent an atrophied mind. The stagnant mind gets left behind.
Personal Interests: My personal interests are varied including playing and watching sports, reading, hiking, swimming, hunting, fishing, television, and most importantly, spending time with friends and family.
Educational Background: I graduated from WSU Vancouver with honors and earned a B.S. in Biology. I then completed my DPT at Eastern Washington University.

Mary Alice Duhme, PT COMT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: Physical Therapy is an amazing career. After 35 years, I still love what I do. I am able to work with patients daily to recover from injury or illness and improve their quality of life. I love building relationships with my patients and helping them progress to better strength, better posture, improved balance and return to the activities they enjoy.

Continuing Education Commitment: I have recently focused my continuing education on Women’s Health/Pelvic Floor dysfunction through the Herman and Wallace Institute. I have also taken courses in Vestibular Rehabilitation to treat dizziness and balance issues. I am presently increasing my manual therapy skills with the IMPACT Program.

Personal Interests: I have been a student of yoga for almost 20 years, which I believe has contributed to my Physical Therapy practice. Living in the Northwest, I love anything that gets me outside-hiking, biking, skiing or tending to my garden. And on a rainy day, I can often be found at a movie.

Educational Background: I received a degree in Biology from the University of California at San Diego, and my Physical Therapy degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Daniel Korman, DPT

Daniel earned a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Eastern Washington University in 2017. He completed undergraduate studies at The University of Texas at Austin, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and a Bachelor of Business Administration in Management Information Systems. In order to advance his clinical skills, he is currently pursuing an Orthopedic Manual Therapy Certification and intends to become certified in pain neuroscience.

Daniel finds that physical therapy lies at the intersection of his professional passions: health and well-being, physical activity, and teaching. He was inspired to enter the field by his brother, who is also a physical therapist, and his aunt, who is an occupational therapy assistant. In his free time, Daniel loves outdoor activities: hiking, rock climbing, and snowboarding.

Snohomish

Hours:
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Balance Rehabilitation
 

  • Vestibular rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment

Lindsey Knox, DPT, COMT, Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I became a physical therapist because of the unique relationship I am able to build with each patient throughout his or her rehabilitation. I enjoy not only being a physical therapist to help improve patients’ physical condition but also to gain a good rapport and trust.

Continuing Education Commitment: I am committed to continuing my education and growing as a physical therapist. After completing a two-year program that specialized in manual therapy, I received my COMT, certified orthopedic manual therapist. I have also taken numerous courses involving Kinesio Tape, which allowed me to become a certified Kinesio Taping Practitioner.

Personal Interests: In my spare time I enjoy spending time with my family and staying physically active with yoga and hiking.

Educational Background: I have received a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Shenandoah University, a private college in Virginia and also hold a B.S. in Biology from the University of Idaho where I was a Division I scholarship athlete. I am currently enrolled in Seattle Pacific University’s MBA program and will complete this degree over the next few years.

Tim Peterson, PT

Why I am a Physical Therapist: When volunteering at a local hospital by chance I was placed in the Physical Therapy department. I immediately found that I enjoyed helping people solve their physical problems. The opportunity to continue to educate and help my patients have a better quality of life is the reason I have continued in this profession for the past thirty five years.

Continuing Education Commitment: I’m committed to the process of continually being open to learn new techniques and skills through attending conferences and seminars, but also from other Physical Therapists and doctors. I also feel that part of my commitment to education is to be available to help teach and mentor other Physical Therapists or assistants with less experience. I have had thirty years of on the field experience in sports injuries of all types and attended NAIOMT through level 3.

Personal Interests: I enjoy watching and participating in all sports especially baseball and football. I love to explore new areas of the Northwest with my wife in our TAB trailer and I enjoy the adventure of fly fishing a wilderness lake or river.

Educational Background: Bachelor’s degree in Physical Therapy, California State University Long Beach 1978.

Tyler Cox, DPT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: My interest in physical therapy began at a young age, when I became interested in the biomechanics of the different sports with which I was involved. During my years as a collegiate athlete, I was able to experience the profession of physical therapy from a patient’s point of view and was incredibly grateful for the care that I received. These encounters motivate me to work closely with my patients to help them meet their personal goals beyond the physical milestones expected of them.

Continuing Education Commitment: My commitment to my patients relies on education. It is my personal responsibility as a Physical Therapist to be fully engaged in new techniques and relate them to my applicable patients. I am dedicated to expanding my knowledge as techniques and technologies are developed, and currently pursuing my Certification in Manual Therapy and Olympic Weight lifting.

Personal Interests: In my spare time, I enjoy being active, golfing, and supporting Seattle sports.

Educational Background: I received both my Doctorate in Physical Therapy and B.S. in Biology from the University of Washington. During my undergraduate years, I also attended Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, where I was a Division I scholarship athlete.

Andrea Vos, PTA

Why I Chose To Become a PTA: During my career as a dancer and fitness instructor, I became increasingly interested in helping people attain and improve wellness through movement and natural means. My experience as a Certified Personal Trainer and as a Chiropractic Assistant provided a great introduction, but never fully addressed the complete picture of why someone is having pain or experiencing difficulty executing a movement properly and then how to solve this more comprehensively. I decided to go back to school and become a Physical Therapist Assistant in order to work hands-on with people as individuals, each with their unique needs and goals, and make a positive impact by teaching them how to allow their bodies to heal themselves.

Continuing Education Commitment: I am fortunate to be a part of the team at Summit in Snohomish and to work part-time at our sister clinic, Cascade, in Silver Lake, as I am regularly exposed to new and different ideas and techniques from a variety of experienced Physical Therapists. Additionally, I enjoy the opportunities to advance and expand my skills both as a PTA and a Group Fitness Instructor with continuing education courses, such as Muscle Energy Technique, PNF, and different fitness formats. Outside of the clinic, I specialize in teaching Barre fitness classes which are a huge complement to the principles of rehab exercise and provide a safe environment for students to learn stability and core control as well as sculpt their figures.

Personal Interests: In my spare time, I enjoy taking and teaching dance classes, “dinking”, reading, bike riding, hiking, and travelling both internationally and exploring the beautiful PACNW. After relocating to Seattle from Chicago in 2011 with my amazing fiancée, Mohamed, I am happy that my immediate family is now all within reasonable driving distance from each other for the first time in many years, including my step-children, whom are best described as “awesome”.

Sultan

Hours:
Monday – Thursday 7:00 am – 6:30 pm
Friday 7:00 am – 6:00 pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management

Lindsey Knox, DPT, COMT, Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I became a physical therapist because of the unique relationship I am able to build with each patient throughout his or her rehabilitation. I enjoy not only being a physical therapist to help improve patients’ physical condition but also to gain a good rapport and trust.
Continuing Education Commitment: I am committed to continuing my education and growing as a physical therapist. After completing a two-year program that specialized in manual therapy, I received my COMT, certified orthopedic manual therapist. I have also taken numerous courses involving Kinesio Tape, which allowed me to become a certified Kinesio Taping Practitioner.

Personal Interests: In my spare time I enjoy spending time with my family and staying physically active with yoga and hiking.

Educational Background: I have received a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Shenandoah University, a private college in Virginia and also hold a B.S. in Biology from the University of Idaho where I was a Division I scholarship athlete. I am currently enrolled in Seattle Pacific University’s MBA program and will complete this degree over the next few years.

Cheryl Robinson, MSPT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I was drawn to physical therapy as a way to empower people to have a hand in their own health, well-being and ability to function. I continue to love my job for those same reasons.
Continuing Education Commitment: I strive to continuously further and better my professional skills and knowledge with up to date education, research and hands on studies.

Personal Interests: In my down time I love being in the outdoors with my 2 boys and my husband, photography and horses.

Educational Background: BS from Indiana University with a Major in Kinesiology and a minor in Psych, Masters in PT from University of Colorado.

Teagan Norton, DPT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: My first introduction to physical therapy was as a young gymnast with knee pain. My physical therapist made such an impact on my life and made it possible for me to continue with the sport. He took the time to teach me about the anatomy and mechanics of my knee so I could become self-sufficient in managing my own symptoms. As a PT I love the opportunity I get to help patients learn about their bodies and become more active in managing their own health. I especially love working with children and helping them develop healthy habits from a young age!

Continuing Education Commitment: I am currently working on a fellowship through the Ola Grimsby Institute to become a Certified Orthopedic Manual Therapist (COMT).

Personal Interests: In my spare time I enjoy reading, being outdoors, and spending time with my family and friends.

Educational Background: I Graduated with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Eastern Washington University and BS in Health Science from Whitworth University.

Pat Shipe, PTA

Why I’m a Physical Therapist Assistant: I chose to become a physical therapist assistant because I love helping people. I want to teach people how to improve and progress their functional outcome by giving them the tools and knowledge to continue striving for a healthier and more functional body and life.

Continuing Education Commitment: I want to continue learning for my patients. I strive to improve my knowledge, manual skills and techniques, and to upgrade current exercises to give my patients the best care so they can achieve the greatest outcomes.

Personal Interests: I love spending time with my family, precious grandchildren, and of course our two Boston Terriers. I enjoy reading a good mystery book, or watching movies. Outdoor gardening, bird feeding and watching, and in winter months enjoy knitting and crochet, and playing games on my iPad.

Educational Background: I graduated from Green River Community College with an Applied Associates of Science for Physical Therapy Assistant.